Don’t Bury Your Head in the Sands of Twitter

Posted: September 30, 2010 in Marketing, Nonprofit Social Media
Tags: , , ,

Like sands through the hour glass, so are the tweets of our lives.

“Mike, I sent out a tweet and had no replies, no retweets, no referrals, no donations…nothing happened.”

Statements like that really fire up my hero and author of the recent book UnMarketing (buy it here),  Scott Stratten.  He contends that Twitter is a conversation…”a networking event that requires no travel.”

Twitter is referred to as “microblogging” and with good reason.  It is the perfect platform for people like me that have micro attention spans.  It is true that a tweeting moment can be a fleeting moment.  Peter Shankman shared that 2.7 seconds is the average attention span (he obviously has not seen my daughters in the American Girl Doll store).

Like a networking event, Twitter requires us to be present.  We can’t tweet and run, Stratten also believes that the life of a tweet is about five minutes.  If someone replies, retweets or inquires and we’re not there it can be considered a lost opportunity — kind of like walking away from someone after asking what they do.

1.9 million tweets an hour.
32,000 tweets a minute.

Now that is enviable volume — it takes commitment, quality content and true engagement to establish relationships in the twittersphere.  It takes conversation — without the travel.

It is a big sandbox, but the great thing is all the big kids playing in it are real nice and always willing to share.

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Comments
  1. I never got twitter, lots of people apparently are into it! I disagree with social networks, i mean not 100% These sites can be useful but at some point it can get obsessive!

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