Posts Tagged ‘advertising’

Only in Scottsdale?

Saw a sign yesterday, going back this week to see if I can get a picture.

“WALK IN BOTOX”

OK, ‘fess up, who’s the marketing consultant that recommended that strategy to their med-spa client?  Please, please, please send me an e-mail — I’ll buy the coffee, we must meet.

I guess vanity knows no recession (or does it?).  Wouldn’t you love to get the stats on how many “walk-ins” they did have from that campaign?  If I get the courage up, I’ll go in and ask.

Remember when “walk-ins welcome” signs were reserved for barbers or hair salons?

A sign like that can cause a business some perception challenges:

  1. How will existing clients feel?
  2. What if I made an appointment 3 weeks ago and saw that?
  3. It’s kind of cheap and cheesy — are the needles clean?
  4. The guy selling beef jerky out of his van has the same banner and font.

It’s a race to get customers and keep them.

botox race

Differentiate yourself in service and how you get your message out.

The challenge: what message would you have the medspa put on their sign?

My idea: “Botox – No Waiting, No Lines”

What’s yours?


Be Remarkable, Not Replaceable.

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Ever sit in a meeting in which a very lengthy debate ensues over which photograph or artwork should be used in marketing materials?

Photographs, fonts, colors — all the pretty stuff I’m not very good at.

BUT!

Crystal pepsi Pictures, Images and Photos

What if the product or service really sucks? (Sorry Mom, I mean ‘what if the product is really kind of bad and won’t live up to the hype?’)

Focus on delivering a great product, program or service, create the fans and you won’t need pretty packaging to wrap it up in.

Authenticity carries far more influence than paper thickness, fonts and ink colors.

Be remarkable, not replaceable.

I saw a billboard today that had me laughing, cringing, and appalled all in the time took to drive by it.

To spare anyone embarrassment I’ll not share the hopsital, but it sure could end up on Lettermen or Leno.

Imagine in the midst of the current debate raging in health care and savvy consumers demanding our best in terms of service and reading the following:

Faster E.R. Waiting Times

First I must disclose that I am not and E.R. groupie — If I’m ever in an emergency room, something’s broken — badly broken.

“Faster” and “waiting”????  What were they thinking putting those two together.  I’m sure the marketing genius that put the campaign together worked real hard at it.  The image that comes to mind is simply disturbing.

Define faster.  How about, “your butt won’t feel like it’s part of our plastic furniture.”  “Your kid won’t cry herself to sleep waiting to be seen.”  “The broken bone won’t set itself while you wait.”  “Our staff will keep you updated during your visit.”

Use caution when crafting your message and if you’re going to be brave and address stigmas like ER waits use extreme caution.

Faster ER Waiting Times — at Oxymoron Hospital.