Posts Tagged ‘team building’

“…to boldly go where no man has gone before.”

One would be hard-pressed to find a more dramatic phrase from a mission/vision statement.  Can non-profit enterprises boldly go where no organization has gone before?  I’d argue yes, with the right crew.

Captain Kirk: inspirational leader, heart and emotion, gets in the ring, lives for the mission
Spock: grounded in science and logic
Uhura: ability to translate and communicate on many platforms
Bones: brings emotionally charged debate to the table
Scotty: can creatively fix anything — makes the vision/direction happen at all costs
Red shirts: still go on the mission even though their life expectancy is the lowest

A regular practice of leaders should be to take an introspective look at their teams.  Is the team poised for action or reaction?  Culture of complacency or one of progress and adventure?  Is there diversity of ideas?  Are meetings a useless exercise or are they filled with lively discussion, debate, decisions and action?

Who is at the table has a direct correlation to what gets done.

I’m considering adding “Vulcan” as a check-box on our employment application — those that check it will be real interesting people.

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As a leader, what role are you playing with your team?

Ever work with a leader that simply serves as a scorekeeper, tracking the team’s errors, fouls and scores (in that order)?  I can get an equipment manager to keep score and likely for a lot cheaper (that also answers my constant question of “would they miss you if you were gone”…not likely).

The scorekeeper can’t get injured, benched or traded.  Where’s your risk as a leader — on the field with your team or tucked safely away on the sidelines (or worse – in the skybox)?

This economy has the scorekeepers very worried — shareholders are looking for action-oriented players, not those who have mastered the monitoring of players’ actions.

How does your team see you?  Leaders are not defined by titles.

Position yourself as a player/coach — own the risk.  Let the results serve as the score.

Be remarkable, not replaceable.